Serving the Ponchatoula and Springfield Area
G & G Computer Repair

12152 Hwy 22, Ponchatoula, LA 70454
Gary Marmillion, Sr. & Gary Marmillion, Jr.
Ph. 225-294-3683

How to buy a "Cheap" PC
(and what to look for)
Updated 2/19/2017

    You want a new PC but don't have a lot of money?
    And don't know what to look for?
    Some of the more baffling and esoteric computing terms are explained below.

    Can't afford a brand new PC but you still need a computer? Check out a Refurbished Computer

What to look for:
No matter which brand PC you get there are four important things you should consider very carefully (look closely at the specifications).

    In addition to checking the new PC specifications for these four important components in your new PC you may want to see information concerning prices that you can expect to pay for a new PC. You may also want to consider whether it is cost-effective to purchase an extended warranty for your new PC.

    Look also at the difference between a laptop PC and a desktop PC and the limitations of All-in-one PCs and especially iOS and Android Tablets.

    View my recommendations for the components in a new PC. This is followed by suggestions about software and then where and how to search for the best deals on your new PC, including if you are buying online or in a local store.

    If you need a new computer display (monitor) along with your new PC see my thoughts on PC Monitors.

Finally, don't forget to safeguard your PC against mishaps and disasters.

Operating System: (OS)
    I heartly recommend Windows 10 for your new PC!

32bit or 64bit OS
    Generally you will not need to be concerned since all new Windows computers are now 64bit capable (x64 based processor) and have a 64bit version of the Windows OS installed. You would not want a 32bit OS in any case, since this would limit your available RAM to less than 4GB.

I recommend creating recovery media after you buy a Windows 10 PC! To avoid a large download of the Windows 10 OS from Microsoft.
    However, you can get a genuine copy of the Windows 10 operating system by
downloading it from the internet with the Media Creation Tool from Microsoft.
    Using this downloaded copy of Windows 10 you will be able to get your PC up and running again if your PC's hard drive fails and you cannot use the refresh or reset feature of Windows 10 or the installed recovery partition on your hard disk drive. Note: This also assumes that your PC is past its warranty period.

    Any recovery media you create - on DVDs or a USB Flash Drive - will save you a lot of trouble since it is a much easier way to recover your PC from a hard drive failure than a huge download and custom install of the Windows operating system.
    You will probably need to bring your PC to a PC technician to do the work. So recovery media could save you $$$. Go to this page on my site to learn how to create your recovery media.

Important! Recovery media should not be considered backup media. It is important for you to save your file updates and new files on seperate backup media (flash drive or hard drive).

    Beware of really cheap, faux PCs with the Chrome OS (Chromebook) or the Android OS. You will need a reliable and relatively fast internet connection for a Chrome PC to function properly. Generally you will be dissatisfied with either of them if you were expecting them to perform in the same manner and at the same level as a normal Windows PC.
    Neither of them runs Windows programs.
    You may end up complaining over and over: Why can't I do the same things with this POS as my friend Joe can do with his Windows PC? Nearly any tablet PC can do as well - or better!

    However, with all of that said, if all you want is an inexpensive machine that will access the internet a Chromebook may be all you need. Read more about Chromebooks here.

Processor: The brains of the PC
    Both of the major PC processor manufacturers, Intel and AMD, have continued to introduce newer and faster versions of their PC processors and rankings have become a bit muddled. For instance, late last year Intel introduced its 4th generation processors. But now, for laptops only, Intel has moved on to its Fifth Generation power-saving mobile processors. (The desktop processors were delayed)
    Late this year or early next year Intel will again introduce a new line of processors, code-named Skylake, which will include both mobile processors for laptops and desktop processors.

Processor Rankings
    Much depends on the generation of the processor, its clock speed, and the amount of cache memory installed, but in general processor rankings are as follows: (Note: not included in this list are the low-powered Intel Atom and the ARM chips produced primarily for tablet PCs)

  • AMD E1 is usually the least expensive and the least powerful processor.
  • Intel Celeron is the next least expensive and is only nominally more powerful than the AMD E1.
  • AMD dual core (AMD A4) is next in line.
  • Intel Pentium (latest dual core version) is a bit more expensive and, again, a bit more powerful than all of those above.
  • AMD Quad Core A6 (3600 or higher)

    The two top-of-the-line processors for low-cost PCs are first the AMD A8 quad-core (6100 or higher) and finally the Intel Core i3.
    A PC with an i3 processor installed may increase the cost of a PC to more than $400, but it's worth the extra cost if you can afford it.

    The Intel quad-core i5 forth generation processor normally comes in mid-range rather than low-cost PCs. However the i5 is substantially more powerful and capable and is preferable to any of the above. The AMD A10, and the FX series (6100 or higher) processors are said to be in this class.
    (Note: In notebook PCs most Intel i5 processors are lower-powered (mobile) dual-core rather than quad-core.)

    Top of the line PCs usually have an Intel Core i7 (or occasionally a FX 8000 series or higher) processor installed. These processors, especially the i7, are expensive, when compared to the others above. A PC containing one of these will usually be priced at least $200 above those with a less powerful processor. However the Intel Core i7 will normally provide upscale performance, even in a laptop PC.
    Personally, I am partial to Intel Core Processors (i3, i5 or i7) rather than AMD A-series processors, especially in Laptops. The Intel processors tend to cost a bit more, but I consider that extra bit of money well spent.

Random Access Memory: RAM (sometimes referred to as DRAM)
     RAM is the working memory of your PC. Very simply: the more, the better to enable your PC to run multiple programs at once and avoid disk swapping, a condition which can slow your PC severely at times.
    Even the cheapest of PCs now comes with at least 2 Gigabytes (GB) of RAM memory. However, the minimum recommendation for Random Access Memory for a modern PC running Windows 7 and 8 (and Windows 10) is now Four (4) gigabytes or more.
    Note: It is unlikely that you will need more than 8GB of RAM memory installed in your new PC even if you install an SSD, unless you plan to do a lot of heavy video editing or work with especially large databases and/or spreadsheets.

Hard Drive - Your PC's File Cabinet
    Your PC's hard drive holds the Windows OS (operating system) files as well as all of your data.
    It is preferable to get a PC with the largest capacity and fastest hard drive you can afford. A 500GB hard drive running at 5400rpm is now a common size and speed for a low-end PC. You may not need a larger hard drive but if you can afford a PC with a faster one running at 7200rpm, (in your desktop PC) get one - you will be glad you did.
    A 7200rpm hard drive will load the OS faster, which allows your PC to start rapidly, and access your data quicker.

    If your finances allow, installing a Solid State Harddrive (SSD) will energize and speed up your new or late model PC. You can usually get a 250GB (or 256GB) SSD for less than $150 if you install it yourself. I recommend either a Samsung or a Crucial branded SSD. See my
SSD page for more information.

What's the point?
    A computer with higher-end components will usually boot and start programs faster. It will also be far less likely to choke even when you load the PC with software that may add numerous startup items or try to run more than one or two programs at the same time.

    Assuming software congestion, a hardware fault, or PC virus/malware is not the cause, even a brand new PC can run sluggishly if it has insufficient RAM memory, a weak processor, and a slower hard drive.

    Additionally, the higher end PC will continue to perform at higher levels as it ages. That means your higher-end cheap PC will not become obsolete quite as fast as a really cheapo PC.
    If you're not careful and you opt always for the cheapest options you could end up with a PC that's practically obsolete even before you boot it up for the first time!
    You usually get what you pay for.

Cheap PCs price range: (These are prices for Desktops. Laptops may cost a bit more.)

  • Extremely low-end - $250 to $300, (Don't bother with one of these unless you're desperate!)
  • Mid low-end - $300 to $400
  • High low-end - $400 to $500.
These prices include no extra peripherals, only the computer, keyboard and mouse.

    If you plan to spend more (over $550) then you should start looking at a PC with an Intel i5 forth generation processor, 6 to 8 GB of RAM, and a 1TB (terabyte) hard drive running at 7200rpm.

    A dedicated video (display) card would also be an excellent idea. A 1GB video card should only add about $50 to $75 to the cost of your PC. Later on, if you decide you want to use your PC to play graphics intensive games you can usually add a card to most desktop PCs if you don't overload the power supply. Be sure to check first!
    An installed display card (dedicated video) tends to take some of the load off the processor enabling the PC to run a bit more smoothly. This will help if you normally perform graphics intensive operations such as graphics or video editing - not so much with normal web surfing or office tasks.
    If you wish to play graphics intensive games a display card may be a necessity.
    Note: A dedicated disply card for a Laptop is normally only available in higher end laptop PCs. However, if you want a graphics card in your new laptop you will need to purchase a model that already has one. Unlike most desktop computers, it is nearly impossible to add a graphics card to a laptop that shipped without one.

Do you really need to purchase an extended warranty?
    No matter where you buy your new computer you will be faced with the choice to purchase an extension to the standard one-year in-home warranty that comes with nearly all new PCs. If you are buying online it will be easy to ignore the offers for extended warranties but if you are in a local store the salesperson may strongly suggest that you really need one.
    My advice is to firmly decline. Why? Because if there is a manufacturing defect with with the computer you buy it will almost always show up sometime in the first few months of use then the standard warranty will take care of it. You will either get your computer repaired or get a replacement for it straight from the manufacturer.
    Extended warranties are big money makers for those who sell them since it's rare when a manufacturing defect waits more than a year to make itself evident. If there's something mechanically wrong with your new PC it won't take long for it to go belly up!
    You were trying to get a cheap PC anyway, right? So why pay more than you really need to pay?
    Be aware that manufacturer's warranties do not normally cover software problems.

What about a Mac?
    Apple makes quality computers, but Mac PCs are not cheap. The Mac Mini is the the least expensive Apple PC you can get right now at around $500.
    It comes with the excellent MacOS, an i5 Intel processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 500GB 5400rpm hard drive - but no standard DVD drive, mouse or keyboard.
    Take note that Apple believes this is the least powerful computer you should get.

    But for the same $500, or perhaps a bit more, you can get a Windows 8 Desktop PC with an Intel i5 quad-core processor, 6 to 8GB of RAM and a 1 Terrabyte 7200rpm hard drive - with a DVD burner, keyboard, and a mouse included.
    Think about it!

Laptop (notebook PCs) vs Desktop PCs
    The benefits of a laptop PC are: Display included - no need to buy a separate monitor. Compact and portable - use it almost anywhere. Touch screen models are available at a higher price.
    On the other hand Laptops are usually a bit more expensive than desktops with comparable specifications. Laptops use lower-power mobile processors that are generally less powerful (and cooler running) than comparable desktop processors. Batteries generally do not last that long before requiring recharge, especially in low-end PCs.

    If you don't absolutely need a portable PC you may be better off with a traditional desktop or an All-in-One PC. You will get more PC for the money. Expect to spend at least $500 to $600 for a good, 15.6 inch, well-equipped laptop PC.

Concerning touch sceens on Laptop PCs
    Do you really need a touch screen on your new laptop PC?
    This depends on whether you really want a touch screen, not whether you need it.
    In my opinion, no one really needs a touch screen on any PC, except a tablet PC that does not ship with a keyboard or a touchpad.

    A laptop PC with a touch screen will normally cost at least $50 more than one without a touch screen.
    As an example, I found two laptop PCs for sale online. One had a touch screen with 4GB of RAM and the other had no touch screen but had 6GB of RAM. The PCs were priced the same.
    Personally, I would rather have the extra RAM than a touch screen on my new PC.

All-in-One PCs
    In the last few years computer manufacturers, such as Dell, Hewlett Packard, and others, have introduced Microsoft Windows based computers with all PC components tucked into the case behind the display, very similar to Apple's popular iMac. Lower end computers of this type are similar to Laptops in that they sometimes contain low-power processors, less RAM, and slower hard drives than comparable priced desktop PCs.
    Not all All-in-Ones are handicapped in this manner so it is wise to look closely at the PC specifications before buying an All-in-One PC. Be wary, if it's priced too low you should be suspicious, prompting you to check closer and further. As with Laptops, touch screen equipped models will be more expensive.

What about an inexpensive tablet?
    By now everyone has either seen or heard about the iPad and its lower cost Android copycats. Most electronic tablets are great for reading books (or any kind of reading). Cloud computing and surfing the internet is also relatively simple, albeit on a small screen, but only if you have either a wireless router or cellular. Taking and viewing photos with a tablet is usually simple.

    However if you really need a computer (to get real work done) then buy a real PC. You will have a physical keyboard to do your typing, a large hard drive to store your files which will be easily transferable by means of USB flash drive or disk, as well as internet downloads.

    A tablet's main drawback is its dependence on wireless communications and, with the possible exception of photos, its poor and clunky data transfer capability, especially without wireless availability. Memory space for tablets is usually very restricted and low compared to laptop or desktop PCs.

    Another glaring weakness of many tablets is that the battery is usually non-replacable or not easily replaceable. If the battery fails your tablet is bricked unless you pay a substantial fee for replacement. Occasionally the cost is prohibitive - possibly as much as a new tablet in some instances.
    Be sure you do your research before purchasing a tablet PC!

    If you want a graphical representation of what a PC can do as opposed to a tablet take a look at this slide show article from PC World Magazine.

Bottom Line - Recommendations
    A desktop PC with a late-generation Intel Pentium dual-core processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB hard drive is my minimum recommendation, even if you are strapped for cash.
    But if you can afford a little more then choose a PC with an Intel i3 dual core or AMD A8 quad-core processor, 6 to 8GB of RAM, and a faster hard drive running at 7200rpm.

    As I have implied above, the least powerful PC I believe you should get is one with a forth-generation Intel i5 quad-core processor (or an AMD A8 processor), 8GB of RAM, and a 1TB 7200rpm hard drive (in a Desktop PC.

    For a Laptop PC, my minimum recommendation is a PC with a late-generation Intel Core i3 processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB hard drive. However, a late-generation Intel core i5 dual core processor along with 8 GB of RAM is always more preferable.

Software - Download free software to save money
    If you want to get any real use out of your new PC you will need software for it. You will need a decent word-processing program and a good anti-virus program at minimum.
    The good news is that you don't need to spend a lot of money on computer programs if you have internet access. You can download a free office suite - Libre Office or Open Office - that has much of the functionality of Microsoft Office.

    Also, you really need and can also get a free antivirus program. Activate Microsoft's Windows Defender (it's already installed on your new PC) or choose from Avast or AVG. Just be sure to always choose the free option when installing or updating the latter two programs! Take the free stuff and run!
    If you activate or install another (free) antivirus program you should first uninstall any paid (subscription based) antivirus software that came with your PC. Running two active antivirus programs at the same time is not recommended - you will likely not be protected.

    For more information about free software, tips about downloading it, and advice for avoiding the pitfalls - see my page Freeware for specific recommendations.

    The main point here is that by choosing to use free software you may save enough cash to get a better and faster PC when you need to replace your old one. Just saving the on-going cost of antivirus software over the life of your PC can accomplish this.

Do some online shopping around before you buy
    If you happen to have access to an internet-connected computer look at the offerings from the major computer manufacturers. Especially the ones with online stores:
    Dell Computers, HP Computers - also check Walmart and Best Buy online.
    Note: If you decide to buy directly from a computer maker's online site be aware that you may have to wait a week or more for your new custom configured PC to be delivered.

Shop by brand?
    Everyone has their favorite brands and this applies to PCs as well. But all PC makers get their components from the same suppliers. And their products have to be in good working order when shipped to the consumer. If not they wouldn't be in business very long.
    However if you are planning to get the lowest-cost PC you can find you should remember one thing. Low-cost PCs are built with lower-cost and less capable components. Quality costs just a bit more.

Get coupons to save money
    Everyone loves sales. And the PC makers know this also. They are almost always running some type of price promotion to get you to buy. Look for these promotions when viewing their sites.

    In addition you may want to check the LogicBuy site to look for brand specific discount coupons that may enable you to save money when purchasing a PC directly from a PC maker's site.
    Another excellent place to look for coupon deals is PC Magazine's Deal Page. You'll find some excellent prices for both laptops and desktops on this page.
    Coupon deals on these pages can be worth anywhere from $50 up to 40% off of the normally advertised price!
    Be aware that many of these coupons are usually very specifically targeted. They do not apply to all PC configuations available on a PC maker's site unless expressly stated.
    However it is possible to find a $50 off coupon that can be applied in the shopping cart to lower the price of nearly any PC offered by that maker.
    These savings and free shipping may make it worthwhile to order directly from the manufacturer even if you must wait a week or two for your new PC to be delivered.

    For a number of reasons some of these specials and coupons are not highly advertised. You must actively search them out. So if you do not urgently need a new PC take some time to view the specials & sales and look for discount coupons at LogicBuy and other discount sites.

Find the best prices - anytime
Another site to peruse for special deals is DealNews which publicizes the sales and best prices from stores like Amazon, Best Buy, Newegg, Tiger Direct, Walmart and many others.

Computer Monitors (Display)
    Think about your computer monitor. You will be looking at it a lot. If you have a bad or worse yet, an old, bad display, eventually your eyes will pay for it.
    You can now get a good 20inch flat panel PC LCD display for less than $150, or even less than $100 if you look hard enough. Most lower-cost LCD monitors are usually standard HD (1366x768), sometimes referred to as 720p. But for a bit more money you can get a full HD LCD monitor (1920X1080). Your eyes will thank you!

    You don't always get the best price for a monitor simply because it's bundled with the PC when you buy it. Get the best computer display you can possibly afford!

Use your HD TV as a computer monitor
    Alternatively, if you have a late model full HD 1080p (1920X1080) 40 inch or smaller LCD TV you can connect your PC to it with a HDMI cable which will give you both video and sound. Use your TV for double duty and surf the net on your TV! Get a wireless keyboard and mouse so you can back up a bit for comfortable viewing.
    Note: A really large TV (46 inch or larger) may be overwhelming for a computer, but it's really a matter of choice. You'll almost certainly need a wireless keyboard and mouse to enable you to back away from a large TV for comfortable viewing.

    If you already have a good flat panel monitor look around to see if you have an adaptor for it for the newer video connections that come with new PCs. Most older PCs use a VGA connection. Many newer PCs use a connection called DVI. Some even use HDMI. Some have multiple video connections.
     Be sure you have the correct connector or adapter so you won't have to make another trip to the store before you can use your new PC. Either a DVI or HDMI connection is full digital and necessary for full HD (1920X1080) resolution.

Be ready for disaster
    Just because you have a new PC there is no guarantee that you will have no problems. If your hard drive fails or you should happen to get a bad PC virus, requiring a re-install of the Windows operating system, you may end up losing all your irreplaceable files, photos, and music that you have accumulated.

Remember, If you have a good current backup of your important personal files PC mishaps such as severe malware infestation (ransomware) or hard drive failure will be only an inconvenience rather than a true disaster.

    To guard against this possibility, I recommend that when you get your new computer also spend a few extra dollars on a USB flash drive, on which to back up your personal files. All you will need to do is drag your files to the flash drive and they will be saved - ready to be reloaded onto your PC if a PC mishap should strike.
Keep your backups current!
    I recommend a USB 3.0 drive, at least 16GB - 32GB would be even better. A 16GB flash drive is inexpensive yet plenty large enough to hold your common files. Cost is usually less than $20 or possibly even less than $10 if you can find one on sale!
    In addition, a USB 3.0 device is much faster than the older, and more common, USB 2.0. Most new PCs have at least one USB 3.0 port.
    Keep your backups current and you will never need to worry about losing your personal data. When you eliminate the malware or replace your hard drive simply reload your data from the flash drive!

    For more information (especially about creating recovery disks) see my file
How to Backup your PC.

About Chromebooks (and other non-Windows devices)
    As I mentioned earlier on this page, Chromebooks, Android devices and Apple iOS tablets are well suited to surf the internet and run their own (often cloud-based) versions of productivity programs. New Chromebooks can now run Android apps! This severely limits the market for Android-only laptops and, yes, large Android Tablets also. Most Chrome and Android devices can be considered cheap internet appliances. However, Apple iOS devices are anything but cheap!
    Some Chromebooks cannot be considered cheap either!
    At this writing, Chromebooks seem to be overtaking Apple's iPad in educational settings since they are less expensive, normally have a keyboard, and surf the internet just as well as any other PC-like device.

    The caveat, is that all of these devices require a robust internet connection to perform their basic functions. A Chromebook without an internet connection and a wireless router is severely limited in use compared to a traditional Windows PC.
    With all of that said, if you have no need to use Windows software and have a good Cable or DSL internet connection along with a decent wireless router then a Chromebook may be exactly what you are looking for.

Before you buy
    Consider that most, if not all of your personal data will be stored on a cloud-based server. This should not concern you if you are familiar with Microsoft Onedrive or Dropbox. But also consider that this cloud-based storage will not be free for the life of your appliance (as it normally is for Onedrive - up to 15GB). You will eventually need to start paying for it at some point in the future.
    My recommendation is to combine your Onedrive storage with
Google Drive and get an extra 15GB of free storage - 30GB total free.

    Before buying a Chromebook to replace your old Windows PC I urge you to do some research first. See the Google Chromebook page and see if a Chromebook will fully serve your needs.

    Also see the Microsoft page describing the differences between Windows PCs and Chromebooks.

    Here is a slightly biased independent comparison of Windows PCs and Chromebooks. The writer is irritated because of Microsoft's add campaign concerning Chromebooks and Chromeboxes, however his facts are accurate.

Finally, PC World has published a web page for Chromebook setup called How to set up your new Chromebook the right way.

Refurbished Computers and Monitors
    There are some very good deals to be had for refurbished Desktop PCs and also older flat-panel monitors. I would hesitate to recommend to anyone to go out to buy someone's old computer and monitor, unless you know the person selling it very well. Generally all you're doing is buying someone's problems and paying to make them your own.
    Having said that I've noticed that there are a few acceptable places to shop for refurbished electronic equipment, especially PCs.

Where to look for refurbished PCs
    I recommend
Amazon.com, Ebay.com, Newegg, or Tiger Direct since all places will offer some sort of guarantee that you will receive exactly what you ordered. Some PCs come with a warranty.
    What you can expect to pay: On both Amazon and Ebay refurbished Desktop PC prices start at a bit less than $100, add a flat-panel 17" or larger monitor for another $50 or so. I've seen some refurbished PC and monitor bundles run as high as $250 or more for later model PCs and larger monitors. I've also noticed that Tiger Direct has some very good prices - starting at substantially less than $100.
    Note: While I consider it accepable to purchase a refurbished desktop PC I have serious reservations about refurbished laptops since they will likely be much more expensive.

What to look for
    Operating System: You certainly don't want anything too cheap or too old. A PC that runs Windows 95, Millenium or Windows XP is too out of date to use even for normal modern PC tasks. I recommend a PC with a valid copy of Windows 7 SP1 installed. The 64bit version is preferred, but 32bit will do if it allows you to save some serious dollars.
    Note:Windows should start and run without hesitation or any password. There should be no other files or programs on the hard drive except the Windows operating system. In addition the Windows OS should be valid and genuine.
    For more info view the Microsoft page about buying refurbished PCs

    Installed RAM(random access memory): For the 32 bit version at least 2 or 3GB of RAM is preferable. But for the 64bit version of Windows at least 4GB or more is desirable.
    Processor (CPU): Look for at least a Intel Pentium D or Intel Core 2 Duo processor.
    Hard Drive size: An 80GB hard drive is barely enough space to hold the Windows operating system as well as any of your data you will accumulate. I recommend at least a 160GB SATA hard drive, 250GB or 320GB would be even better if you can afford it.
    Check all other peripheral equipment when you receive your PC: Even a refurbished PC should ship with a decent USB keyboard and a USB mouse. The DVD player should be in working order as well as all of the ports - USB, VGA, ethernet port, audio port etc. Check them all by plugging a device into them upon receipt of your PC - attach a monitor and insert a DVD. All components should be in working order. If not, a return for your money back is very appropiate.
    If everything is not working properly the seller did not refurbish the PC very well, or at all. If you find even one thing wrong also look inside the case to see if it has been cleaned. (you should probably do this in any case) If you got the refurbished PC through one of the above named dealers they will likely require that the seller pay for the return shipping if you did not receive what you paid for. Be sure to ask!

HAPPY COMPUTING!